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biodiverseed:

I added chocolate mint and peppermint to the herb spiral today. I’m still looking for pineapple mint, apple mint, bergamot mint, and a curly spearmint. 

In the wider mint family (Lamiaceae), I am cultivating Lemon Balm (Mellissa officianalis), two rosemary varieties, a number of basils, five different thymes, two varieties of lavender, marjoram, and oregano; and, I am also harvesting the wild deadnettle that grows everywhere. It is a diverse family of plants, also including other herbs such as hyssop, trees such as teak, and decorative plants such as coleus. 

Plants in this family often spread easily through their roots, and can quickly become invasive. I cultivate my mint-family herbs in an herb spiral to have maximum control over where they can spread in the garden.

#garden hacks #DIY #herbs

Wegmans opens affinage facility

cheesenotes:

image

Last year I posted about Wegman’s partnership with Cornell on a new cheesemaking educational program, and their plans to open a new affinage facility; it looks like the big day has come, as they officially announce that the caves are open for business. Via The Buffalo News:

Wegmans opens its cheese caves

Wegmans’ cheese caves are open for affinage.

The supermarket has begun full operations at its 12,300-square-foot cheese-ripening building in Rochester. Under the watchful eye of an “affineur,” or cheese-ripening specialist, specialty cheeses will be aged and finished before being sold at Wegmans stores.

The building will house a Brie room and rooms for seven other kinds of soft cheeses and washed-rind cheeses.

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"Warm Springs, California. Harry Konda is shown above in strawberry field on March 27, 1942, six weeks before he and 142 other farmers were evacuated from this district in Santa Clara County. He is an officer of the Japanese American Citizens League. Evacuees of Japanese descent will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration."

National Archives Identifier: 537589

Dorothea Lange, Photographer. From the series: Central Photographic File of the War Relocation Authority, 1942 - 1945

armenianhighland:

լավաշ 
Lavash 

Lavash is a flatbread that originated in Armenia. Armenian cuisine is one of the most ancient in the Caucasus and the world overall and Lavash holds an important place in it. 

Lavash is symbolic of life and wisdom. It is one of the symbols of the Armenian people and their culture. Etymologically it means ‘good (lav) bread (hats). It is considered to be ‘holy bread’ and some bakers slash a cross on the uncooked dough before baking it. Lavash holds an important place in many different Armenian traditions. For instance, lavash is put on the shoulders of the bride and groom at weddings to protect them from evil and give them good luck. 

How easily happiness begins by

dicing onions. A lump of sweet butter

slithers and swirls across the floor

of the sauté pan, especially if its

errant path crosses a tiny slick

of olive oil. Then a tumble of onions.

This could mean soup or risotto

or chutney (from the Sanskrit

chatni, to lick). Slowly the onions

go limp and then nacreous

and then what cookbooks call clear,

though if they were eyes you could see

clearly the cataracts in them.

It’s true it can make you weep

to peel them, to unfurl and to tease

from the taut ball first the brittle,

caramel-colored and decrepit

papery outside layer, the least

recent the reticent onion

wrapped around its growing body,

for there’s nothing to an onion

but skin, and it’s true you can go on

weeping as you go on in, through

the moist middle skins, the sweetest

and thickest, and you can go on

in to the core, to the bud-like,

acrid, fibrous skins densely

clustered there, stalky and in-

complete, and these are the most

pungent, like the nuggets of nightmare

and rage and murmury animal

comfort that infant humans secrete.

This is the best domestic perfume.

You sit down to eat with a rumor

of onions still on your twice-washed

hands and lift to your mouth a hint

of a story about loam and usual

endurance. It’s there when you clean up

and rinse the wine glasses and make

a joke, and you leave the minutest

whiff of it on the light switch,

later, when you climb the stairs.

Onions

By  William Matthews 

odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal
The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.
Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.
Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.
Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.
Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal
The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.
Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.
Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.
Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.
Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal
The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.
Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.
Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.
Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.
Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.
Zoom Info
odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal
The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.
Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.
Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.
Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.
Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.
Zoom Info

odditiesoflife:

The Ancient Art of Honey Hunting in Nepal

The Gurange tribes of Nepal have been collecting honey from Himalayan cliffs for centuries. The Gurung are master honey hunters, risking their lives collecting honeycomb using nothing more than handmade rope ladders and long sticks known as tangos.

Most of the honey bees’ nests are located on steep, inaccessible, southwest facing cliffs to avoid predators and for increased exposure to direct sunlight.

Aside from the dangers of falling, they are harvesting honey from the largest honey bees in the world. The Himalayan honey bee can grow up to 3 cm in length.

Before a hunt can commence, the honey hunters are required to perform a ceremony to placate the cliff gods. This involves sacrificing a sheep, offering flowers, fruits and rice, and praying to the cliff gods to ensure a safe hunt.

Photographer Andrew Newey spent two weeks living with the Gurung in central Nepal, documenting the risks and skill involved in this dying tradition.

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